Politics and Ethics

Faculty
Humanities & Social Sciences
Department
Political Science
Course Code
POLI 2200
Credits
3.00
Semester Length
15
Max Class Size
35
Method Of Instruction
Lecture
Seminar
Typically Offered
To be determined

Overview

Course Description
This course will examine political controversies that raise fundamental ethical issues in contemporary public life and the political choices of public officials. The course will analyse the ethical dimensions of public policy and examine basic questions such as the proper place of ethics in politics, the difference in ethical behaviour in the public and private spheres, and whether the state should be neutral with respect to moral beliefs. Specific topics and issues will include, for example, the limits of political power, the rule of law, conflict of interest, minority cultural rights, health care, and debate over the welfare state.
Course Content
  1. Introduction to ethics and politics.
  2. The limits of political power.
  3. Debates over the role of ethics in politics.
  4. Conflicts of interest and patronage.
  5. Governance, public policy and ethical choices.
Methods Of Instruction

Instructor presentation of the course will involve the use of formal lectures, structured group work, and in-class discussion of assigned materials. Additional readings may be assigned for each course unit and placed on library reserve or via selected websites. Audio-visual and interactive materials may be used.

Means of Assessment

The course evaluation will be based on course objectives and in accordance with the policies of Douglas College and the Department of Political Science. A minimum of 40% of the student’s course grade will be assigned to examinations, a minimum of 30% will be assigned to the various components of a formal research essay, and a maximum of 30% will be based upon components such as quizzes, short essays, participation, and class presentations. Specific evaluation criteria will be provided by the instructor in course outlines.

 

One example of an evaluation system:

 

Participation                                    10%

Quizzes                                          10%

Research-based position papers        30%

Mid-term exam                               25%

Final exam                                     25%

                                Total:           100%

Learning Outcomes

Upon conclusion of the course, successful students will be able to:

  1. demonstrate an understanding of the main ethical theories and approaches to assessing politics and government;
  2. address basic issues such as the proper role and place of ethics in politics, the nature and limits of political obligation, and under what circumstances individual or social interests should prevail;
  3. critically assess a selected range of governance and policy issues confronting local, regional, and national governments.
Textbook Materials

Textbooks and Materials to be Purchased by Students:

 

Textbooks and readers will be selected based on instructor expertise and preference, and in consultation with the Department of Political Science. There are a range of textbooks and readers that can fulfill course objectives. Some examples include:

 

Carmichael, Don, Tom Pocklington and Greg Pyrcz. Democracy, Rights and Well-Being in Canada

      (Toronto: Harcourt Canada, 1999).

 

Greene, Ian and David Shugarman. Honest Politics (Toronto: James Lorimer and Company, 1998).

 

Hare, R. M. Essays on Political Morality (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998).

 

Klosko, George. Democratic Procedures and Liberal Consensus (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004).

 

Mancuso, Maureen et al. A Question of Ethics: Canadians Speak Out (New York: Oxford University

     Press, 2006).

 

Skoropski, John. Ethical Explorations (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000).

Requisites

Prerequisites

POLI 1101 or POLI 1102 or POLI 1103 or permission of the instructor

Corequisites

No corequisite courses.

Equivalencies

No equivalent courses.

Course Guidelines

Course Guidelines for previous years are viewable by selecting the version desired. If you took this course and do not see a listing for the starting semester / year of the course, consider the previous version as the applicable version.

Course Transfers

Institution Transfer Details Effective Dates
Athabasca University (AU) AU POLI 3XX (3) 2012/09/01 to -
College of the Rockies (COTR) COTR POLI 2XX (3) 2012/09/01 to -
Kwantlen Polytechnic University (KPU) KPU POLI 2XXX (3) 2012/09/01 to -
Langara College (LANG) LANG POLI 2XXX (3) 2009/09/01 to -
Okanagan College (OC) OC POLI 2XX (3) 2012/09/01 to -
Simon Fraser University (SFU) SFU POL 211 (3) 2009/09/01 to 2017/08/31
Simon Fraser University (SFU) SFU POL 2XX (3) 2017/09/01 to -
Thompson Rivers University (TRU) TRU POLI 2XX (3) 2009/09/01 to 2010/08/31
Thompson Rivers University (TRU) TRU POLI 2XXX (3) 2010/09/01 to -
Trinity Western University (TWU) TWU POLS 2XX (3) 2009/09/01 to -
University Canada West (UCW) UCW POLI 102 (3) 2012/05/01 to 2016/12/31
University Canada West (UCW) UCW POLI 2XX (3) 2009/09/01 to 2012/04/30
University Canada West (UCW) UCW POLI 2XX (3) 2017/01/01 to -
University of British Columbia - Okanagan (UBCO) UBCO POLI 2nd (3) 2009/09/01 to -
University of British Columbia - Vancouver (UBCV) UBCV POLI 2nd (3) 2009/09/01 to -
University of Northern BC (UNBC) UNBC PHIL 2XX (3) or UNBC POLI 2XX (3) 2009/09/01 to -
University of the Fraser Valley (UFV) UFV POSC 2XX (3) 2009/09/01 to -
University of Victoria (UVIC) UVIC POLI 2XX (1.5) 2012/09/01 to -
University of Victoria (UVIC) UVIC POLI 3XX (1.5) 2009/09/01 to 2012/08/31
Vancouver Island University (VIU) VIU PHIL 2nd (3) 2009/09/01 to -

Course Offerings

Fall 2021

CRN
Days
Dates
Start Date
End Date
Instructor
Status
33799
Wed
07-Sep-2021
- 08-Dec-2021
07-Sep-2021
08-Dec-2021
Nesbitt
Darin
Open
Max
Enrolled
Remaining
Waitlist
35
16
19
0
Days
Building
Room
Time
Wed
New Westminster - South Bldg.
S1620
11:30 - 14:20