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Registration for the Fall 2019 semester begins June 25.  Watch your email for more details.

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Calculus II Honours Supplement

Course Code: MATH 1221
Faculty: Science & Technology
Department: Mathematics
Credits: 1.0
Semester: 15 weeks
Learning Format: Seminar
Typically Offered: TBD. Contact Department Chair for more info.
course overview

This course is a supplement to MATH 1220-Calculus II with an emphasis on proving theorems from MATH 1220. Topics include the definite integral, properties of integrals, applications of integration, sequences and series, Taylor series. MATH 1220 must be taken at the same time as MATH 1221.

Course Content

  1. The Definite Integral
  2. Applications of Integration
  3. Sequences and Series
  4. Taylor Series

Methods of Instruction

Lectures, assignments, group activities

Means of Assessment

Evaluation will be carried out in accordance with Douglas College policy.  The instructor will present a written course outline with specific evaluation criteria at the beginning of the semester.  Evaluation will be based on some of the following criteria:

Tests: 25 – 70%
Assignments: 0 – 20%
Group Work: 0 – 10%
Attendance: 0 – 5%
Final examination: 30 – 40%

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of MATH 1221 the student should be able to:

  • Demonstrate understanding of upper and lower Riemann sums and refinements, and how they relate to the definition of a definite integral
  • Use the definition of a definite (Riemann) integral to prove properties of the definite integral
  • Prove the Mean Value Theorem for integrals
  • Prove the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus
  • Prove the substitution rule for integration
  • Define the logarithm as an integral and use properties of integrals to derive properties of logarithms
  • Use the integral definition of the logarithm to define the exponential function and derive its properties
  • Use tables of integrals to assist in determining definite and indefinite integrals
  • Approximate definite integrals using numerical methods
  • Solve problems involving further applications of definite integrals such as, but not limited to, moments, center of mass, probability, hydrostatic force and pressure, logistic growth, centroids and the theorem of Pappus
  • State the definition of the limit of a sequence and use it to evaluate the limit of sequences
  • Use the definition of the limit of a sequence to prove properties about limits of sequences
  • Understand the role of the completeness property in convergence of bounded monotonic sequences
  • State the definition for convergence of a series and use it to show convergence of different series
  • Use the definition of a convergent series to prove properties of convergent series
  • Justify the validity of the following convergence tests: comparison test, limit comparison test, integral test, alternating series test, ratio test, root test
  • State the definition of absolute convergence and conditional convergence of a series
  • Prove that the absolute convergence of a series implies convergence of a series
  • Estimate the value of a convergent sequence using error bounds for partial sums
  • State the definition of a power series
  • Prove properties of power series
  • State the definition of a Taylor series
  • Prove the remainder theorems for Taylor series
  • Derive the binomial series and solve problems using a binomial approximation

course prerequisites

MATH 1120, MATH 1121

Corequisites

MATH 1220

curriculum guidelines

Course Guidelines for previous years are viewable by selecting the version desired. If you took this course and do not see a listing for the starting semester/year of the course, consider the previous version as the applicable version.

course schedule and availability
course transferability

Below shows how this course and its credits transfer within the BC transfer system. 

A course is considered university-transferable (UT) if it transfers to at least one of the five research universities in British Columbia: University of British Columbia; University of British Columbia-Okanagan; Simon Fraser University; University of Victoria; and the University of Northern British Columbia.

For more information on transfer visit the BC Transfer Guide and BCCAT websites.

assessments

If your course prerequisites indicate that you need an assessment, please see our Assessment page for more information.