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Registration for the Fall 2019 semester begins June 25.  Watch your email for more details.

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Listening and Speaking Skills for Advanced Students of English as an Additional Language

Course Code: ELLA 0850
Faculty: Language, Literature & Performing Arts
Department: English Language Learning and Acquisition
Credits: 6.0
Semester: 15
Learning Format: Lecture, Seminar
Typically Offered: TBD. Contact Department Chair for more info.
course overview

This is an integrated listening and speaking course for students who wish to upgrade their listening and speaking skills for educational and/or employment purposes. This course is most appropriate for students who are intending to take college or university courses. Through listening to materials from a variety of sources on many subjects, students will improve their ability to understand and respond appropriately in increasingly complex or problematic situations. Students will also improve their listening and speaking skills for academic study by participating in and leading small discussion groups, making formal presentations, and taking notes and organizing these notes to complete academic assignments. Students will continue to develop language skills including grammar, sentence structure, vocabulary and pronunciation elements.

Course Content

Listening

Comprehend information presented in academic lectures (up to about 20 minutes in length).

  • Identify purpose and/or issue, overall key idea, main ideas (stated or implied) and details.
  • Identify phrases and sentences that mark topic introduction, topic development, topic shift and conclusion.
  • Identify rhetorical discourse markers and patterns of chronological order and sequence, comparison and contrast, and cause and effect.
  • Interpret factual information, explanations and opinions.
  • Identify some nuances in attitude, emotional tone and register.
  • Refer to pre-listening and reference materials, and use context clues (e.g., synonyms) to determine meanings of unfamiliar words and phrases.
  • Take notes.

Follow conversations, discussions, or reports on topics that are generally familiar, about general knowledge, or related to specialized or college-related issues.

  • Use pre-listening techniques to prepare for a listening task.
  • Identify topic, key ideas and details (stated and unstated).
  • Identify situation and relationship between participants.
  • Identify speaker's purpose, intent, attitude and feelings.
  • Identify facts and opinions.
  • Follow rhetorical discourse markers and patterns of chronological order and sequence, comparison and contrast, and cause and effect.
  • Refer to pre-listening and reference materials, and use context clues (e.g., synonyms) to determine meanings of unfamiliar words and phrases.
  • Take notes.

Listen for discrete items.

  • Listen for specific information (e.g., names, dates, statistics).
  • Listen for specific pronunciation elements (e.g., word stress, thought groups, rhythm and intonation, final sounds, reductions).
  • Write from dictation.
  • Transcribe speech.
  • Write from dictocomps (retelling a story).

Use study skills.

  • Use notes to complete assignments and prepare for quizzes.

Speaking

Give presentations (of up to 20 minutes, on topics which are familiar, concrete, or abstract) to describe and explain structures, systems or processes based on research.

  • Select and narrow a topic.
  • Gather information/prepare outline.
  • Identify, locate, and cite source material, and demonstrate an understanding of plagiarism.
  • Prepare visuals and explain models, formulas, graphs, tables, or other schematics.
  • Present information using connected discourse.
  • Express main ideas and support them with details.
  • Provide an introduction, development and conclusion.
  • Narrate coherently so that agents, actions, circumstance, process and sequence are clear.
  • Show awareness of style and formality.
  • Provide accurate and somewhat detailed descriptions, explanations or accounts.
  • Use effective presentation style: eye contact, body language, vocal delivery, and language use.
  • Prepare questions for follow-up discussion.

Participate in conversations, discussions and interviews.

As participant

  • Listen and actively contribute.
  • Use appropriate language functions and gambits (short expressions used to open, close and extend conversation).
  • Use functions appropriately for expressing possibility, speculating, and critiquing.
  • Describe problems, clarify details (with diplomacy if necessary), indicate possible options or solutions, give reasons.
  • Ask relevant questions to gather, share, analyze and compare information.
  • Summarize information and ideas to clarify and expand understanding.
  • Express and qualify opinions, feelings, doubts and concerns.
  • Appropriately oppose or support a stand or solution.
  • Ask follow-up questions to keep the conversation going.
  • Encourage others to participate.
  • Hold the floor, interrupt appropriately, and resume after an interruption.

As leader

  • Give instructions for group tasks.
  • Assign responsibilities.
  • Use gambits to effectively maintain discussion.
  • Ask follow-up questions, manage turn-taking to keep the conversation going.
  • Encourage others to participate.
  • Hold the floor, share the floor, draw others out and thank them for their contribution and information.
  • Keep group on task.
  • Introduce guests or speakers appropriately.

As interviewer

  • Prepare questions.
  • Explain purpose.
  • Ask/clarify questions.
  • Take notes.
  • Synthesize/summarize notes.

Give instructions or directions.

  • Use correct sequence of steps for instructions.
  • Use clear references and provide necessary details.
  • Use appropriate intonation and rhythm so that listener can follow instructions.
  • Check to confirm understanding.

Give impromptu talks on spontaneous topics and under timed conditions.

Participate in brief professional phone calls.

  • Open, maintain, and close a phone conversation in a professional manner.
  • Provide information in a professional manner.
  • Clarify and confirm information.
  • Use appropriate levels of formality.

In the above tasks, use appropriate pronunciation elements such as individual sounds, word/sentence stress, intonation, rhythm.

Reading and Writing

To prepare for, support, and extend listening and speaking.

  • Follow written instructions.
  • Use pre-reading techniques.
  • Identify purpose and/or issue, overall key idea, main ideas, and key details.
  • Use context clues to determine meanings of unfamiliar words and phrases.
  • Use readings in speaking tasks.
  • Write reflectively.
  • Write notes, outlines, interview questions and answers, reports, summaries and paragraphs.
  • Use written materials in speaking tasks (e.g., reports).

Accuracy

1. Grammar and Sentence Structure

  • Review all verb tenses, especially past perfect and future perfect.
  • Correctly form and use all conditional tenses.
  • Correctly form and use reported speech (including tense changes, embedded questions and instructions).
  • Identify and correctly form infinitive, gerund, and base form verbals.
  • Correctly use articles and other determiners.
  • Review a variety of complex structures and sentence patterns including basic conditionals, noun clauses and relative/adjective clauses.

2. Vocabulary

  • Use an expanded range of concrete, academic, and idiomatic vocabulary related to a wide range of topics.
  • Identify and correct errors in word choice and word form.

3. Pronunciation

  • Apply pronunciation elements such as special intonation patterns, vowel and consonant sounds.

4. Register

  • Identify and use a wide range of different styles and registers appropriate for formal and informal academic audiences and situations.

Self-monitor for accuracy:

  • Apply knowledge of parts of speech, word choice, register, sentence elements, specified sentence types and mechanics as specified for this and previous levels to identify and correct errors.

Classroom skills

Take responsibility for the following:

  • Attendance and punctuality
  • Class work and assignments
  • Participation and teamwork

Use common software to communicate and to complete information management tasks such as to word process assignments, send emails, or sign into myDouglas or Blackboard.

Methods of Instruction

The instructor will facilitate, observe and evaluate students’ participation in communicative activities.  Whole and small group instruction will be combined with individual assistance and student-directed learning.  Students will participate in the setting of goals by identifying their communicative and language development needs, and will participate in the selection of learning activities.

Means of Assessment

Student achievement will be assessed using the mastery system in accordance with College policy. Evaluation will be based on CLB and instructor specified criteria. Mastery will be granted to students who achieve an average of 70% on the following portfolio items for both listening and speaking. For final evaluation at the end of term, student portfolios will contain at least six listening tasks and six speaking tasks; some tasks may be a combination of both skills.

Evaluation will include, but need not be limited to, the following tasks.

Listening

Complete at least two listening and note-taking tasks in class.  These may include listening to a video or audio lecture, interview, documentary, or speech (up to 20 minutes in length). Assessment criteria may include, but are not limited to, the ability to:

  • Identify stated and unspecified meanings.
  • Identify the main idea (which is not explicitly stated) and detailed information.
  • Interpret factual information, explanations and opinions.
  • Identify facts, opinions and attitudes.
  • Identify rhetorical discourse markers and patterns of chronological order and sequence, comparison and contrast, and cause and effect.

Complete at least one listening and note-taking project (individual or group). This may include attending/taking notes on a class lecture at Douglas College or a community presentation, listening to/taking notes on an interview, or attending a play or other cultural event and completing a follow-up task. Assessment criteria may include, but are not limited to, the ability to:

  • Identify stated and unspecified meanings.
  • Identify the main idea (which is not explicitly stated) and detailed information.
  • Interpret factual information, explanations and opinions.
  • Identify facts, opinions and attitudes.

Listen to and understand at least one set of complex multistep directions or instructions (12+ steps). These may include listening to instructions from an instructor about an assignment or using Blackboard/MyDouglas, instructions about registering for a new course, or instructions from a classmate.  Assessment criteria may include, but are not limited to, the ability to:

  • Identify sequence markers, cohesive devices, and other linguistic clues to infer order of steps.
  • Demonstrate comprehension by following the instructions.

Listen to and understand at least two recorded conversations between several people on a general or study-related topic.  Assessment criteria may include, but are not limited to, the ability to: 

  • Identify implied meanings and stated and unspecified details.
  • Identify situations and relationships between participants.
  • Identify speakers' purpose and intent.
  • Interpret emotional state/mood/feelings/attitude.
  • Identify some nuances in tone and register.
  • Identify the functional value of utterances such as warnings, threats, suggestions or recommendations.
  • Evaluate the validity of suggestions or proposed solutions.

 Speaking

Give at least one formal individual presentation (up to 20 minutes) based on research that describes/explains a structure, system, or process.  Sample presentation topics could be the college appeal process, legal system, or election process.  Assessment criteria may include, but are not limited to, the ability to:

  • Present information using connected discourse.
  • Express main ideas and support them with details.
  • Provide an introduction, development and conclusion.
  • Narrate coherently so that agents, actions, circumstance, process and sequence are clear.
  • Show developing awareness of style and formality.
  • Provide accurate and somewhat detailed descriptions, explanations or accounts.
  • Show awareness of appropriate eye contact, body language, volume and rate.

Give at least one formal report/summary/proposal to propose or recommend solutions to a problem. This may include reporting on/summarizing a current event or recent trend and offering solutions, proposing an extension for a class assignment, or explaining a problem with a service or procedure at the college and offering solutions. Assessment criteria may include, but are not limited to, the ability to:

  • Describe problems and clarify details.
  • Indicate possible solutions, recommend the best ones, and give reasons.

Participate in at least one formal discussion about a controversial issue. Assessment criteria may include, but are not limited to, the ability to:

  • Provide detailed information and present options as needed.
  • Ask relevant questions to gather, share, analyze and compare information.
  • Summarize information and ideas to clarify and expand understanding.
  • Express and qualify opinions, feelings, doubts and concerns.
  • Appropriately oppose or support a stand or solution.
  • Hold the floor, share the floor, draw others out, and thank them for their contribution and information.

Give at least one set of complex instructions for a technical or non-technical task, procedure, or process.  Sample assessment tasks could be to give detailed, multistep instructions to a student on how to write a reference page for a report, appeal a grade, or apply for Canadian citizenship.  Assessment criteria may include, but are not limited to, the ability to:

  • Use correct sequence of steps.
  • Use clear references and provide necessary details.
  • Use appropriate intonation so that listener can follow.
  • Check to confirm understanding.

Participate in at least one conversation including less routine social communication such as expressing and responding to empathy, clarifying a conflict, and providing reassurance.  A sample assessment task could include a role-play in which a student helps a classmate who is going through a difficult time (family illness, relationship difficulties, financial stress, academic trouble, etc.) or a role-play to resolve conflicts between class project members. Assessment criteria may include, but are not limited to, the ability to:

  • Express and respond to sympathy, conflicts and complaints.
  • Ask follow-up questions to keep the conversation going and encourage others to participate.
  • Hold the floor, interrupt appropriately, and resume after an interruption.

Participate in at least one brief professional phone call.  Sample assessment tasks could include speaking with a classmate/team project member to resolve a conflict, speaking with a college employee to arrange an appointment or to collect information. Assessment criteria may include, but are not limited to, the ability to:

  • Open, maintain, and close the conversation in a professional manner.
  • Provide information in a professional manner.
  • Clarify and confirm information.

Students may also be required to complete oral tasks with a specified level of delivery competence. This must include appropriate eye contact, body language, and vocal delivery features such as voice quality and appropriate pauses.

Students may also be required to complete quizzes, both skill-based and content-based.

Classroom skills

Complete at least one self-assessment of learning strategies, progress, strengths, weaknesses, and classroom skills to be discussed with the instructor.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

Listening

  1. Understand extended (up to 20 minutes) monologues or presentations (with visuals) on topics that are generally familiar and related to general knowledge or academic topics (CLB L 8-IV-ii).
  2. Understand communication intended to influence or persuade (such as extended warnings, threats, suggestions, recommendations, and proposed solutions) in situations related to personal decisions or to academic issues (CLB L 8-III).
  3. Understand extended multistep (12+ steps) directions or instructions for technical or non-technical tasks (CLB L-8-II).
  4. Understand group interactions about abstract and complex ideas on familiar topics (CLB L 8-IV-ii).
  5. Understand moderately complex social exchanges, either face to face, on the phone, or via digital media (such as expressions of and response to gratitude, hopes, appreciation, complaints, disappointment, satisfaction, dissatisfaction, approval, disapproval, formal welcomes and farewells, condolences, and congratulations) (CLB L 8-I).

Speaking

  1. Give presentations (up to 20 minutes, on familiar, concrete, or abstract topics) to describe and explain structures, systems or processes based on research (CLB S 8-IV-ii).
  2. Propose or recommend solutions to problems in a familiar area, sometimes related to situations requiring clarity and diplomacy (CLB S 8-III).
  3. Give detailed information; express and qualify opinions or concerns; present solutions and options; indicate opposition or support for a stand in one-to-one interactions and small group discussions or meetings (CLB S 8-IV-i).
  4. Give instructions and directions for a broad range of technical and non-technical tasks, procedures and processes (CLB S 8-II).
  5. Participate in less routine social conversations for most everyday purposes (such as expressing and responding to empathy, clarifying conflicts and providing reassurance) where tone and register may have an impact on the outcome (CLB S 8-I).
  6. Participate in brief formal phone calls, involving some less familiar and non-routine matters (CLB S 8-I-ii).
  7. Monitor and apply strategies to an instructor specified level of accuracy in grammar, sentence structure, and word choice, and pronunciation.

 Classroom Skills

  1. Assess own progress.
  2. Participate effectively in a college classroom.

course prerequisites

ELLA 0750 OR a minimum of CLB 7 in both speaking and listening

A minimum of CLB 6 in both reading and writing is also recommended for this course.

curriculum guidelines

Course Guidelines for previous years are viewable by selecting the version desired. If you took this course and do not see a listing for the starting semester/year of the course, consider the previous version as the applicable version.

course schedule and availability
course transferability

Below shows how this course and its credits transfer within the BC transfer system. 

A course is considered university-transferable (UT) if it transfers to at least one of the five research universities in British Columbia: University of British Columbia; University of British Columbia-Okanagan; Simon Fraser University; University of Victoria; and the University of Northern British Columbia.

For more information on transfer visit the BC Transfer Guide and BCCAT websites.

assessments

If your course prerequisites indicate that you need an assessment, please see our Assessment page for more information.