Course

Society and Environment

Faculty
Humanities & Social Sciences
Department
Sociology
Course Code
SOCI 2270
Credits
3.00
Semester Length
15 Weeks
Max Class Size
35
Method(s) Of Instruction
Hybrid
Online
Lecture
Seminar
Course Designation
Certificate in Global Competency
Industry Designation
None
Typically Offered
To be determined

Overview

Course Description
Environmental sociology is a field that provides insight into the complex social processes which define, create and indeed threaten ecosystem processes. By discussing issues of science and technology, popular culture, economics, urbanization, racial and gender relations, as well as social movements, this course will reach a broad understanding of environmental issues. More specifically, this course will investigate the relationship between various environmental and social problems, as well as the many political ideologies, philosophies and movements that have continually redefined how we think of nature and sustainability.
Course Content
  1. Introduction to environmental sociology: Environmental problems and society
  2. The material conditions of life: How consumption, the economy, technology, development, population, and the health of human bodies shape environmental situations
  3. The treadmill of production and consumption
  4. Political economy
  5. Demography and community
  6. The role of ideas: How culture, ideology, moral values, risk, knowledge, and social experience influence the way we think about and act toward the environment
  7. The social construction of nature
  8. Environmental discourse and practice
  9. The risk society
  10. Moving to action: How we might better resolve environmental conflicts, taking both the material and the ideal into account
  11. Democracy and the politics of sustainability
  12. Ecological governance
  13. Sustainable communities

 

Learning Activities

The course will employ a variety of instructional methods to accomplish its objectives, including some of the following:  lectures, seminar presentations, audio-visual materials, small group discussions, research projects, in-class and community dialogues, research papers, seminar presentations, and public writing.

Means of Assessment

Evaluation will be based on course objectives and will be carried out in accordance with the Douglas College Evaluation Policy. The instructor will provide a written course outline with specific criteria during the first week of classes.

An example of a possible evaluation scheme would be:

Sustainability dialogue   20%
Dialogue proposal    5%
Midterm exam   15%
Final exam   15%
Op-Ed or other public writing   10%
Seminar presentation   15%
Ecological footprint   10%
Participation   10%
Total 100%

Students may conduct research with human participants as part of their coursework in this class. Instructors for the course are responsible for ensuring that student research projects comply with College policies on ethical conduct for research involving humans.

Learning Outcomes

At the conclusion of the course, the successful student will be able to:

1. Explain perspectives on human-nature relations influenced by their social, economic, political, cultural, historical, physiological and bio-geographical contexts.

2. Apply various approaches to environmental sociology, and what conceptions of education, knowledge, self, and community underlie these various approaches.

3. Identify considerations that are crucial to developing environmental programs and practices that are ethically and democratically justifiable.

4. Critically analyze their own understandings and experiences of nature and their place in it.

5. Demonstrate understanding of the following themes:

  • Nature: human construction or unmediated reality? The interplay of material and ideal factors.
  • Social and global dimensions of environmental ethics such as wilderness preservation movements, wise use movements, and environmental justice movements.
  • Dimensions of ecological thought such as ecofeminism, deep ecology, transpersonal ecology, and bioregionalism.
  • Critiquing goals such as sustainable development, sustainable communities, and sustainable consumption.
  • Citizenship and engagement including the important influence of democratic institutions and commitments in our environmental practices.
  • Place and narrative including the mind-body concept, mind-body-place and privilege, place-centered education, community action, and policies focused on sustainability.
  • Policies and programs developed by government, industry and other institutions at the regional, provincial, national, and international levels.
Textbook Materials

Texts will be updated periodically. A typical example is:

Bell, Michael Mayerfeld and Loka Ashwood (most recent edition). An Invitation to Environmental Sociology. Thousand Oaks: Sage.

 

Requisites

Course Guidelines

Course Guidelines for previous years are viewable by selecting the version desired. If you took this course and do not see a listing for the starting semester / year of the course, consider the previous version as the applicable version.

Course Transfers

These are for current course guidelines only. For a full list of archived courses please see https://www.bctransferguide.ca

Institution Transfer Details for SOCI 2270
Kwantlen Polytechnic University (KPU) KPU SOCI 2XXX (3)
Simon Fraser University (SFU) SFU SA 2XX (3)
Thompson Rivers University (TRU) TRU SOCI 2XXX (3)
University of British Columbia - Okanagan (UBCO) UBCO SOCI 2nd (3)
University of British Columbia - Vancouver (UBCV) UBCV SOCI 2nd (3)
University of the Fraser Valley (UFV) UFV SOC 2XX (3)
University of Victoria (UVIC) UVIC SOCI 2XX (1.5)
Vancouver Island University (VIU) VIU SOCI 2nd (3)

Course Offerings

Winter 2023

CRN
Days
Dates
Start Date
End Date
Instructor
Status
CRN
13724
Fri
Start Date
-
End Date
Start Date
End Date
Instructor Last Name
Ashe
Instructor First Name
Siobhan
Course Status
Open
Max
Enrolled
Remaining
Waitlist
Max Seats Count
35
Actual Seats Count
22
13
Actual Wait Count
0
Days
Building
Room
Time
Fri
Building
New Westminster - South Bldg.
Room
S0620
Start Time
12:30
-
End Time
15:20