Biology

Code Course Description
BIOL 1100

Trends in Biology

This course offers an overview of essential biological concepts and principles, and their connection with current issues in society. Topics include genes and inheritance, evolution, the diversity of life, ecology, as well as form and function in plants and animals. This is a laboratory course for students who are not majoring in sciences. It does not fulfill the prerequisites for second and third-year biology courses.

BIOL 1103

Human Anatomy and Physiology I

Human Anatomy and Physiology I is an introduction to the study of anatomy and physiology of humans. Cell biology and the biochemistry of cells are examined, and the levels of organization in the human body are studied. The anatomy and physiology of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems are covered.

Enrolment is usually limited to students in Health Science and Sport Science programs.

BIOL 1104

Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology

This course is a basic introduction to the anatomy and physiology of humans, and is intended for students with little or no background in biology. Cell biology and the biochemistry of cells are introduced, including DNA replication and protein synthesis. The anatomy and physiology of the digestive, circulatory, respiratory, urinary, nervous and reproductive systems are covered.

BIOL 1105

Human Anatomy & Physiology I

This course uses a problem-based learning format to study the anatomy and physiology of humans. Students use a problem-based process to examine cellular structure and function, tissue structure, homeostasis, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, circulatory, respiratory, and immune systems. Enrolment is usually limited to students in the Therapeutic Recreation program.

BIOL 1109

Human Anatomy and Physiology I

Human Anatomy and Physiology I is an introduction to the study of anatomy and physiology of humans. Cell biology and the biochemistry of cells are examined, and the levels of organization in the human body are studied. The anatomy and physiology of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems are covered.

Enrolment is usually limited to students in Sport Science programs.

BIOL 1110

Principles of Biology: the Biosphere

This course is an introduction to the biosphere, the diversity of life and biotic interactions. The anatomy and physiology of organisms are also studied. With Biology 1210, this course fulfills the requirements of a first year university Biology course.

BIOL 1203

Human Anatomy and Physiology II

Human Anatomy and Physiology II is a continuation of the study of the anatomy and physiology of humans. The anatomy and physiology of the endocrine, circulatory, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems are studied.

Enrolment is usually limited to students in Health Science and Sport Science programs.

BIOL 1205

Human Anatomy & Physiology II

This course is a continuation of the study of human anatomy and physiology. Students use a problem solving process to examine digestion, cellular respiration, fluids and electrolytes, excretion, the nervous system, endocrine system and genetics. Enrolment is usually limited to students in the Therapeutic Recreation program.

BIOL 1209

Human Anatomy and Physiology II

Human Anatomy and Physiology II is a continuation of the study of the anatomy and physiology of humans. The anatomy and physiology of the endocrine, circulatory, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems are studied.

Enrolment is usually limited to students in Sport Science programs.

BIOL 1210

Principles of Biology: The Organism

This course examines the detailed microscopic structure and biochemical functioning of living organisms. Mechanisms of inheritance and evolution are also studied. With Biology 1110, this course fulfills the requirements of a first year university Biology course.

BIOL 1310

Introduction to Biology

This course is an introduction to the biosphere, the diversity of life, biochemistry, cell biology and ecological interactions. Mechanisms of genetic inheritance and evolution are also studied.

BIOL 2103

Human Physiology

This course examines human physiological systems to prepare students for upper level courses in the biomedical sciences. The physiology of the integumentary, nervous, skeletal, endocrine, reproductive, circulatory, respiratory, digestive and excretory systems are examined in detail along with additional study of muscle physiology and disease resistance and immunity.

BIOL 2200

Pathophysiology

The course provides an overview of the functional changes in the body that result from disease processes. Building on the knowledge of normal human anatomy and physiology, students learn the biological basis of changes that occur after loss of normal structure and/or function, including variations due to stage of life. The course will cover the etiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and principles guiding therapies of
commonly occurring (as supported by Health
Canada statistics/data) conditions across several organ systems.

BIOL 2300

Marine Biology

This course examines the history of marine biology, the physical and chemical characteristics of the marine environment, the diversity of marine life, marine ecology, and the effects of humans on the marine environment.

BIOL 2301

Environmental Genetics

This course is a study of the influence of the environment on genetic systems and the implications of genetic manipulation for the environment. The course will highlight environmental issues arising from practice and research in agriculture (e.g. monoculture, hybridization, interspecies gene transfer, cloning, gene manipulation), medicine (e.g. carcinogenesis, mutagenesis, antibiotics, disease, immunity), and other human activities.

BIOL 2302

Urban Landscapes and Biodiversity

This course examines cities and people’s lifestyles from an ecosystem perspective. The properties of the city as a natural environment are described. The impact of cities on surrounding natural environments and more remote ecosystems which serve as supply networks are explored. Global examples of urbanization are discussed in general and local examples are considered in detail. The theme of sustainability will be used to analyze options for change to protect and restore natural ecosystems.

BIOL 2321

Cell Biology

A survey of cell ultrastructure and cellular function. Topics discussed include nuclear, organelle and membrane structures and associated functions, including DNA replication, transcription, RNA functions, translation, protein trafficking, membrane functions, cell signaling and the cell cycle, in addition to the regulation of these functions and processes. Classical cell biology experiments are described along with their contributions to understanding cell structure and functions.

BIOL 2400

General Microbiology

A survey of the biology of microorganisms with an emphasis on bacteria. Topics include prokaryotic diversity, bacterial cell structure and metabolism, microbial growth and reproduction, microbial genetics and ecology, introductory virology and immunology, epidemiology and public health, and selected topics in applied microbiology. Laboratory activities introduce a wide variety of techniques in microbiology and immunology.

BIOL 2401

Introductory Microbiology for Health Sciences

A survey of the biology of microorganisms with an emphasis on bacteria. Topics include prokaryotic diversity, bacterial cell structure and metabolism, and microbial reproduction. Introductory virology and immunology, epidemiology and public health, and selected topics in medical microbiology. Laboratory activities introduce a wide variety of techniques in microbiology and immunology.

BIOL 2421

Cell Biochemistry

The course will provide an introduction to the structure and function of biological molecules. Proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, enzyme kinetics, and energy metabolism will be some of the topics considered. The main metabolic pathways will be examined with emphasis on their regulation and integration with the overall functioning of an organism in various physiological situations.

BIOL 3100

Musculoskeletal Anatomy

The course entails an advanced exploration of the gross anatomy and microscopic structure of the human skeletal and muscular systems, including their vasculature, innervation, and joints. The location and structure of major components of the other organ systems are examined. The surface anatomy of the human body is examined to identify skeletal markings, muscles, and related structures, and to locate major organs. The functional and clinical relevance of selected anatomical topics is also discussed. The theory component is accompanied by laboratory activities and case studies.

BIOL 3103

Immunology

The fundamental principles of immunology are introduced. Cellular, molecular and regulatory mechanisms of innate and adaptive immunity are presented by exploring immunological reactions to infectious agents, allergens, auto-antigens, cancer cells and transplant tissue.

BIOL 3203

Introduction to Pharmacology

This course is designed to provide an introduction to basic concepts of pharmacology and pharmacotherapy. A thorough grounding in pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic principles will be given. In addition, these principles will be applied to the pharmacology of the nervous system, general and local anaesthetics, psychiatric disorders, cardiovascular system, endocrine system, respiratory system, anti-inflammatory and pain relieving drugs, drugs used to treat cancers, and antibiotics. Special topics may include, but are not restricted to, the action of drugs in the gastrointestinal system, renal system or reproductive system; drugs of abuse and pharmacological treatment regimens; drug discovery and experimental design; or ethical issues in pharmacology.

BIOL 3204

Experimental Design and Field Methods

This course will introduce students to experimental design in ecosystem science as well as commonly-used field and laboratory methods. Students will receive instruction in effective note taking, data entry and manipulation, randomization procedures, and the use of good field and laboratory techniques to ensure consistency and reliability of experimental data and analyses. Students will design and implement an experiment to address a specific ecological question.

BIOL 3205

Genetics

This course is the study of the principles of genetics. Topics covered include the physical and chemical basis of heredity, genetic analysis in eukaryotes, prokaryotes and viruses, mutation; population genetics and evolution

BIOL 3305

Ecology

A study of the interaction of living organisms with biotic and abiotic aspects of their environment. Population, community and ecosystem ecology are examined along with a consideration of topics in evolutionary ecology like life history theory, mating systems and social behaviour. The course also investigates conservation of biological diversity and the impact of human activities on natural systems.

BIOL 3306

Population, Community and Ecosystem Ecology

This course will explore advanced topics in population, community and ecosystem ecology, building on knowledge gained in BIOL 3305. The course material will be structured around the interrelatedness of processes across many levels of organization, e.g. evolutionary trade-offs, interspecific interactions, spatial connectivity and energy movement. Students will be challenged to evaluate the principle ecological theories using both historical and current empirical data and apply the theories through case studies and tutorials emphasizing local issues (such as resource management, population conservation and response to climate change).

BIOL 3401

Virology

This course investigates the diversity, evolution and ecology of viruses. General topics such as viral structure, replication, ‘life’ cycles and diversity will be covered in the class. Viruses infecting all forms of life including bacteria, plants, humans and other animals are investigated. The scope of the course ranges from molecular virology to aspects of epidemiology. Current topics in virology are also highlighted including aquatic viral ecology, emerging viruses and the practical application of viruses.

BIOL 3402

Protists & Eukaryotic Diversity

A course surveying the diversity of eukaryotic life, focusing on the protists. Students will be introduced to the history of protistology, the principles of molecular phylogenetics, the origin of eukaryotes, the impact of endosymbiotic events on the evolution and diversification of eukaryotes, and the cell biology, ecology, and evolution of major protist lineages.

BIOL 3403

Environmental Microbiology

This course will introduce students to the field of environmental microbiology, which is the study of microbes in natural environments such as soil, water and air. Investigation will focus on microbial distribution, diversity, physiology, biochemistry, function and ecology along with commonly employed microbiology methods. Topical issues in environmental microbiology will also be discussed, including biotechnology and bioremediation.

BIOL 3421

Nucleic Acids

This course focuses on the structure, function and metabolism of nucleic acids. Topics include nucleic acid metabolism and function, DNA structure and replication, RNA transcription and processing (capping, poly A tail addition, splicing), the formation and function of non-coding RNA (including, rRNA, tRNA, microRNAs and ribozymes), RNA folding, mRNA subcellular localization and RNA dependent RNA/DNA synthesis.

BIOL 3422

Proteins & Proteomics

This course is focused on the fundamental aspects of proteins, including their chemical and physical structure, synthesis and stability, and function. In addition to these fundamentals, classical and contemporary methods used to purify and analyze proteins, and determine or predict their structure will be covered. Current topics in protein structure and proteomics will also be examined.

BIOL 3500

Plant Biology

This course will examine the origins, evolution, diversity, anatomy, physiology and ecology of non-vascular plants, vascular plants, protists and fungi. Laboratory exercises will emphasize form, function, and biological diversity.

BIOL 3600

Comparative Zoology

The course will examine the comparative anatomy, physiology and behaviour of a wide range of animal groups as evolutionary solutions to common functional problems. Topics will include locomotion, respiration, circulation, digestion, excretion and reproduction

BIOL 3610

Invertebrate Zoology

The course will examine the comparative biology of invertebrates in an evolutionary and phylogenetic context, with an emphasis on functional morphology. Topics will include an introduction to invertebrate systematics, a comparative study of systems for locomotion, nervous and sensory perception, feeding, digestion, excretion, growth, circulation, respiration and reproduction. Given the incredible diversity of invertebrates, the course will focus on a selection of invertebrate phyla.

BIOL 3620

Vertebrate Zoology

The course will examine the comparative morphology of vertebrate groups within an evolutionary and phylogenetic context. Topics will include an introduction to the phylogeny of the vertebrates, and a comparative study of systems for locomotion, nervous and sensory perception, respiration, circulation, digestion, thermoregulation, excretion and reproduction.

BIOL 3621

Neurobiology

The course will provide an overview of neural cell biology, neurophysiology and neurochemistry. The molecular and cellular basis of the sensory and motor functions in animals, including their behaviour, will be examined. The theory component will be accompanied by case studies and discussions of current neuroscience topics.

BIOL 3622

Regulation of Development

This course examines the processes which underlie animal development with a focus on how these processes are regulated. Topics discussed include an overview of the field, an overview of transcriptional regulation, how cells break symmetry, the role of morphogen gradients in development, the formation of body plans, the role of non-coding RNA molecules, cell fate plasticity, sex determination, dosage compensation, epigenetics and imprinting.

BIOL 3700

Evolution

This course investigates the process of biological evolution and how it has shaped the diversity of life on Earth. Evolutionary analysis is applied to topics such as adaptation, population structure, speciation, the origin of life, reproduction, symbiosis, social interactions, human health, and environmental issues.

BIOL 4100

Cancer Biology

This course describes the genetic and molecular mechanisms involved in the development of cancer. Topics include analysis of mutations in cancer cells and the effect of mutations on underlying processes such as cell division, proliferation and apoptosis. The prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cancer are introduced including both classical and targeted treatment strategies. The roles of genomics and bioinformatics in classification, prognosis and treatment are explained and discussed.

BIOL 4101

Gerontology

This course explores the biological mechanisms that underlie the aging process. Topics include an introduction to the biology of aging, the evolutionary reasons for aging, aging at the cellular level, the genetics of longevity in both animal and plant models, the physiology of human aging, age-related human diseases and modulation of human aging.

BIOL 4102

Biology of Human Nutrition

This course investigates the biological basis of human nutrition. Selected physiological functions and metabolic pathways of the major nutritional components (protein, carbohydrates, lipids and selected vitamins) are presented, as well as the health effects of non-optimal dietary levels. Nutritional and health aspects of energy balance are also discussed. The structure and processing of major dietary sources, including muscle proteins, milk, and plant products will be investigated. Topical nutritional issues of current interest are also discussed.

BIOL 4103

Human Reproductive Biology

This course explores human reproduction and related topics. Topics include an overview of the anatomy of the female and male reproductive systems, menstrual cycle, ovarian cycle, fertilization, implantation and embryonic development. Reproductive disorders and abnormalities, fetal disorders, teratology, placental complications, parturition, and lactation are also discussed. Special topics may include infertility and the examination of current assisted reproductive technologies.

BIOL 4106

Medical Genetics

This course explores the principles of human genetics and its medical applications. The sequence and structure of the human genome and human genetic evolution will be examined before investigating molecular mechanisms of genetic diseases and disorders. Other topics will include population genetics, epigenetics, genetic testing, clinical applications of genetics and new genetic discoveries for disease treatment. Students will also engage in discussion of current primary research literature in the field of medical genetics.

BIOL 4107

Pain Biology

This course focuses on the underlying biology of pain perception. Topics include the heritability of pain sensation, the neurophysiology of pain sensation, the evolutionary conservation of pain detection across animal species, human pain phenotypes, the genes underlying human pain sensation, and the discussion of the pain related phenotypes of nausea and itchiness.

BIOL 4300

Marine Ecosystems Management

In this course, marine environments, from the tropics to polar regions, will be studied as integrated systems, exploring interconnections between the physical environment, biodiversity, and the impacts of human activity and resource use. This integrated approach will inform an understanding of ecosystem goods and services required for the protection and management of marine systems. The course will examine the knowledge and skills needed to interpret multidisciplinary system data, providing a whole ecosystem approach to the management and sustainable use of marine resources.

BIOL 4305

Conservation Biology

This course will introduce students to the theory, issues and complexities inherent in biological conservation work. Students will be required to work in groups to research a current conservation issue, prepare and lead class activities, and individually submit a final research project based on a current conservation issue. Lectures will be used to clarify conservation theory and to place the subject matter within the context of broader society. Students will be evaluated by both peers and the instructor on the quality of their in-class activities and evaluated by the instructor on their final research project.