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Registration for the Fall 2019 semester begins June 25.  Watch your email for more details.

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Listening in Context I

Course Code: MUSC 1121
Faculty: Language, Literature & Performing Arts
Department: Music
Credits: 3.0
Semester: 15 weeks
Learning Format: Lecture
Typically Offered: Fall
course overview

Introduction to skills for active listening to music with emphasis on the elements of music as they appear in Western art music from the Middle Ages to the Romantic period. Music will be discussed in relation to arts and culture, as well as to relevant aspects of history, geography, belief systems, politics, society, economics, and technology. Students will occasionally work with scores, but listening skills will be emphasized.

Course Content

  1. The elements of music
    • Basic sound characteristics
    • The dimensions of music: temporal (rhythm), horizontal (melody), vertical (harmony)
    • Musical texture: monophony, polyphony, homophony, heterophony
    • Pitch source and organization
    • Dynamics and timbre
    • Musical instruments: instrumentation; classifications including aerophones, chordophones, membranophones, idiophones, electrophones
    • Musical style: composition vs. improvisation; form, and genre
    • Vocal parts: the relation of music and text; vocal styles
    • Cultural contexts for music: the relation of music to the other arts, as well as history, geography, belief
    • systems, politics, society, economics, and technology.
  2. Pre-Tonal Music: 
    • Music in antiquity 
    • Western Christian Chant and early polyphony 
    • Medieval secular music 
    • Renaissance music (including mass, motet, madrigal)
  3. Tonal Music: 
    • Baroque music (including fugue, ground bass, opera, cantata, oratorio, concerto, and suite) with 
    • emphasis on the works of Bach and Handel
    • Classical music (including symphony, sonata, string quartet, piano concerto, and opera) with emphasis
    • on the works of Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven 
    • Romantic music (including German lied, piano character piece, chamber music, program symphony, symphonic poem, German music drama, Italian opera) with representative composers such as Schubert, Schumann, Chopin, Berlioz, Liszt, Brahms, Wagner, and Verdi

Methods of Instruction

The lecture time will be spent in the analysis and discussion of and listening to the musical materials that form the content of this course. In addition, pertinent information with respect to the cultural, social, and political background will be introduced at appropriate times. As much time as possible will be devoted to listening during the lecture but all lectures will prescribe listening assignments of the music studied in class and other similar compositions.

Means of Assessment

Introductory class presentation 5%
Test on Elements of Music 10%
Listening and Written Test on Medieval and Renaissance Music 15%
Listening and Written Test on Baroque Music 15%
Listening and Written Test on Classical Music 20%
Listening and Written Test on Romantic Music 20%
Library assignment and Field Trip participation 5%
Short projects (minimum of two) 10%
Total 100%

Learning Outcomes

The successful student should be able to recognize aurally:
1) The basic elements of music.
2) The relationship of musical components to their cultural context.
3) Styles, genres and forms in Western art music. 
4) Specific compositions and their composers. 
5) The elements of music in selected compositions as they relate to their specific historical, geographical, 
and cultural contexts .

The successful student should be able to recognize aurally:

  1. The basic elements of music.
  2. The relationship of musical components to their cultural context.
  3. Styles, genres and forms in Western art music. 
  4. Specific compositions and their composers. 
  5. The elements of music in selected compositions as they relate to their specific historical, geographical, and cultural contexts .

curriculum guidelines

Course Guidelines for previous years are viewable by selecting the version desired. If you took this course and do not see a listing for the starting semester/year of the course, consider the previous version as the applicable version.

course schedule and availability
course transferability

Below shows how this course and its credits transfer within the BC transfer system. 

A course is considered university-transferable (UT) if it transfers to at least one of the five research universities in British Columbia: University of British Columbia; University of British Columbia-Okanagan; Simon Fraser University; University of Victoria; and the University of Northern British Columbia.

For more information on transfer visit the BC Transfer Guide and BCCAT websites.

assessments

If your course prerequisites indicate that you need an assessment, please see our Assessment page for more information.