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Registration for the Fall 2019 semester begins June 25.  Watch your email for more details.

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Child and Youth Care Practice: Advanced

Course Code: CYCC 2450
Faculty: Child, Family & Community Studies
Department: Child and Youth Care
Credits: 3.0
Semester: 15 Flexible delivery ranging over 2 to 15 weeks
Learning Format: Lecture
Typically Offered: TBD. Contact Department Chair for more info.
course overview

This course provides students with an opportunity to consolidate and enhance child and youth care practice skills. Using current and emerging theory and practice, students will be supported in the application of skills to new settings and in the development of additional skills. The primary focus of the course will be children, youth and families at risk.

Course Content

The following global ideas guide the design and delivery of this course:

  • A significant number of children and youth with whom Child and Youth Care Counsellors work are “at risk”. The issues of the population of children and youth at risk include: learning disabilities, ADHD and/or neuromotor difficulties; fetal alcohol syndrome, depression and potential suicide; street life; abuse; delinquency; post traumatic stress disorder, family crisis, poverty, etc.
  • Child and youth care counsellors work in and with a variety of systems. An understanding of a work setting and the ability to collaborate with other systems is an essential aspect of CYCC work.
  • Stress and crisis are often major causal factors of increasing difficulties in the lives of children, youth and families. Effective response to stress and crisis by CYCC’s can support children, youth and families to adapt to difficult circumstances, to seek additional support where necessary, and to discover effective means to cope and change.
  • Children, youth and families and CYCC’s have a diversity of: culture; religion; family structure; sexual orientation and socioeconomic conditions. Recognition of and response to diversity is central to effective working relationships between children, youth, families and workers.
  • A sense of loss is felt by many individuals and families for a variety of reasons. Recognition of a sense of loss and knowledge of the stages of mourning can provide the CYCC with a sense of direction as she/he works with the individual or family. As people work through issues of loss, a sense of hope develops and they discover new possibilities for the future.
  • Assessment is essential to understanding and planning. Children, youth and families are collaborators in the assessment process
  • The ability to participate in a collaborative planning process with the people with whom you are working is necessary.
  • Competent CYCC practitioners must be able to document their work. Documentation, while holding the practitioner accountable and contributing to continuity, also directly impacts the people with whom you are working.  Documentation, reports and course assignments must always respect confidentiality and be mindful of the potential audience.

Methods of Instruction

  • Lecture
  • Discussions

Means of Assessment

This course will conform to Douglas College policy regarding the number and weighting of evaluations. Typical means of evaluation would include a combination of:

  • Collaborative Learning
  • Research Essays and Reports
  • Field Research
  • Participation
  • Attendance
  • Examinations

This is a letter graded course.

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

 

  1. Identify youth at risk due to: learning disabilities, ADHD and/or neuromotor difficulties; fetal alcohol syndrome, depression and potential suicide; street life; abuse; delinquency; post traumatic stress disorder, family crisis, poverty, etc.
  2. Develop practice strategies to work with youth at risk
  3. Describe effective crisis resolution strategies
  4. Design inclusive practice strategies which responded effectively to diversity of: culture; religion; family structure; sexual orientation and socioeconomic conditions
  5. Discuss assessment from the perspective of the child, youth and family
  6. Use the Circle of Courage (belonging, mastery, independence and generosity) in the discussion and design of practices for youth at risk
  7. Inform other practitioners, verbally and in writing, about a specific area of risk and discuss practice options
  8. Discuss and apply selected approaches to counselling children and youth at risk.

course prerequisites

CYCC 1240 or CYCC 1242 or CFCS 1242

curriculum guidelines

Course Guidelines for previous years are viewable by selecting the version desired. If you took this course and do not see a listing for the starting semester/year of the course, consider the previous version as the applicable version.

course schedule and availability
course transferability

Below shows how this course and its credits transfer within the BC transfer system. 

A course is considered university-transferable (UT) if it transfers to at least one of the five research universities in British Columbia: University of British Columbia; University of British Columbia-Okanagan; Simon Fraser University; University of Victoria; and the University of Northern British Columbia.

For more information on transfer visit the BC Transfer Guide and BCCAT websites.

assessments

If your course prerequisites indicate that you need an assessment, please see our Assessment page for more information.