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Registration for the Fall 2019 semester begins June 25.  Watch your email for more details.

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Professional & Business Practices

Course Code: INTR 2310
Faculty: Child, Family & Community Studies
Credits: 3.0
Semester: Flexible delivery ranging over 2 to 15 weeks
Learning Format: Lecture, Seminar
Typically Offered: TBD. Contact Department Chair for more info.
course overview

This course will give students additional opportunities to explore the roles and responsibilities of the interpreter as a professional. Focus will be on employment preparation and business skills for the freelance interpreter.

Course Content

The following global ideas guide the design and delivery of this course:

  • Interpreters need to understand the significance of developing business relationships in a culturally sensitive manner appropriate to Deaf and non-deaf individuals.
  • An understanding of the Code of Ethics and Guidelines for Professional Conduct and its impact on interpreters’ decision-making is an integral component of an interpreter’s work.  Interpreters must be aware of the impact their decisions have on people and organizations involved as well as on their colleagues.
  • Competent practitioners need an understanding of the market value of their work and are able to negotiate contracts appropriately.
  • As a self-employed individual, interpreters are aware of the importance of time management when accepting interpreting assignments.  They must also be organized in their invoicing, and accepting of work appropriate to their skill.
  • Understanding stress and its impact on interpreters is essential to continued work in the field.
  • Marketing is integral to successful interpreting.  Interpreters need to have a marketing strategy, including a resume and business card that is suitable to both Deaf and majority culture.
  • Self-employed interpreters must comply with the Canadian Income Tax requirements which require them establishing an effective record keeping system.
  • Practitioners’ awareness of their strengths and weakness increases their effectiveness in developing a professional development plan.
  • Information literacy is required for independent learning and critical thinking.
  • To stay current in the field, interpreters must know how to research and evaluate information sources.

Methods of Instruction

  • Lecture/discussion
  • Guest speakers
  • Course readings

Means of Assessment

This course will conform to Douglas College policy regarding the number and weighting of evaluations. Typical means of evaluation would include a combination of:

  • Written assignments
  • Group presentations
  • Videotaped assignments
  • Quizzes
  • Attendance and participation

This is a letter graded course.

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  1. Business management
    • Generate professional relationships with colleagues and consumers of interpretation services
    • Demonstrate the ability to negotiate contracts and fees when accepting an assignment
    • Demonstrate effective organizational, time and stress management skills
    • Design effective and appropriate marketing materials, including business cards and a field-appropriate resume
    • Implement an effective record-keeping system appropriate for a person in private practice which will comply with Canadian income tax requirements
  2. Professional landscape
    • Compare North American professional interpreter associations and recognize their contribution to one’s work
    • Apply the AVLIC Code of Ethics and Guidelines for Professional Conduct when faced with ethical dilemmas
    • Develop a comprehensive professional development plan specific to the areas of practice in which you require further development
  3. Research and Evaluation
    • Research and evaluate information sources within the context of acquiring knowledge in sign language interpretation and related areas.

course prerequisites

B or above in INTR 1241, INTR 1225, INTR 1275

curriculum guidelines

Course Guidelines for previous years are viewable by selecting the version desired. If you took this course and do not see a listing for the starting semester/year of the course, consider the previous version as the applicable version.

course schedule and availability
course transferability

Below shows how this course and its credits transfer within the BC transfer system. 

A course is considered university-transferable (UT) if it transfers to at least one of the five research universities in British Columbia: University of British Columbia; University of British Columbia-Okanagan; Simon Fraser University; University of Victoria; and the University of Northern British Columbia.

For more information on transfer visit the BC Transfer Guide and BCCAT websites.

assessments

If your course prerequisites indicate that you need an assessment, please see our Assessment page for more information.