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Registration for the Fall 2019 semester begins June 25.  Watch your email for more details.

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Counselling & Relationship Building with Children and Youth

Course Code: CYCC 1220
Faculty: Child, Family & Community Studies
Department: Child and Youth Care
Credits: 3.0
Semester: Number of Weeks per Semester: 15 Weeks Flexible delivery ranging over 2 to 15 weeks
Learning Format: Lecture
Typically Offered: TBD. Contact Department Chair for more info.
course overview

This course is designed to introduce students to the basic theory and practice of counselling. The course will emphasize the development of healthy helping relationships, active listening skills and empathy. From the perspective of the professional child and youth care practice of Child and Youth Care and Youth Justice Work, students will learn ways of helping and supporting their client’s children and youth to explore their issues and to cope with related feelings. Culture and worldview will be viewed as essential elements for understanding and responding to client’s children, youth and families.

Course Content

The following global ideas guide the design and delivery of this course

  • The development of a positive working relationship is central to the effective relationships with, and counselling of, children and youth.
  • Child and Youth Care Counsellors seek self awareness, including the impact of their cultural experience on their assumptions and responses.  Likewise, the CYC practitioner seeks to understand the influences of past experiences and cultural contexts on the behaviour and worldview of youth.
  • The elements of respect, genuineness and mutuality are core elements in the counselling process.
  • Counselling children and youth is holistic and systemic; it takes into account all aspects of the individual and all of his or her important contexts.
  • There are multiple ways of, and theories about, helping, counselling and working towards change with children, youth and families.
  • Counselling children and youth is developmentally sensitive.  Ways of engaging children and youth are shaped to fit with, and promote, their healthy emotional, social, intellectual, cultural and physical development.
  • The process of counselling children and youth is aimed at the development of insight and understanding of self, others, and the relationship between self and others with the goal of enabling children and youth to interact more effectively with his/her important systems.
  • The process of child and youth care counselling is skill based.  Effective Child and Youth Care Counsellors understand counselling and relational skills and uses them intentionally while remaining genuine and personal in their interactions with youth.  Building healthy working relationships with children and youth is dynamic and includes discussion, activities and other methodologies.

Methods of Instruction

  • Lecture/practice

Means of Assessment

This course will conform to Douglas College policy regarding the number and weighting of evaluations.

Typical evaluation will include:

  •  written assignments
  •  skill demonstration
  •  small and large group participation           

This is a graded course.

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  1. Practice ethical behaviour within the classroom context by honouring confidentiality and implementing the principles of CYCC ethical guidelines.
  2. Explore the impact of self awareness on the practice of Child & Youth Care.
  3. Demonstrate within the classroom context, an awareness of relational and counseling skills with respect to diverse cultural histories, including Indigenous peoples.
  4. Discuss the elements and stages of at least one model of growth and change.
  5. Examine the impact of realities such as racism, internalized shame, colonization, trauma, oppression, worldviews and personal histories of both CYCC practitioners and the children and youth with whom they may work.

curriculum guidelines

Course Guidelines for previous years are viewable by selecting the version desired. If you took this course and do not see a listing for the starting semester/year of the course, consider the previous version as the applicable version.

course schedule and availability
course transferability

Below shows how this course and its credits transfer within the BC transfer system. 

A course is considered university-transferable (UT) if it transfers to at least one of the five research universities in British Columbia: University of British Columbia; University of British Columbia-Okanagan; Simon Fraser University; University of Victoria; and the University of Northern British Columbia.

For more information on transfer visit the BC Transfer Guide and BCCAT websites.

assessments

If your course prerequisites indicate that you need an assessment, please see our Assessment page for more information.