Curriculum Guideline

Leisure & Recreation Foundations

Effective Date:
Course
Discontinued
No
Course Code
THRT 1102
Descriptive
Leisure & Recreation Foundations
Department
Therapeutic Recreation
Faculty
Applied Community Studies
Credits
3.00
Start Date
End Term
Not Specified
PLAR
Yes
Semester Length
Flexible delivery ranging over 2 to 15 weeks
Max Class Size
30
Contact Hours
60 hours
Method Of Instruction
Lecture
Tutorial
Methods Of Instruction
  • Lecture/discussion
  • Small group work
  • Community visits and experiences
  • Media
Course Description
This course introduces the student to the foundational constructs of leisure, play and recreation. Historical and current perspectives, philosophies, theories and models of leisure are examined. Contemporary professional issues, the development of leisure and recreation as a profession and the interrelationships of diverse leisure service delivery systems are explored.
Course Content

Conceptual Foundations of Play, Recreation and Leisure

  • Conceptual and theoretical basis of recreation and leisure
  • Define recreation, leisure, play, flow, time & work
  • Describe the leisure and phenomenological approaches to theories and models of leisure, recreation and play
  • Historical significance and value of leisure, play and recreation
  • Historical social movements influencing leisure, recreation and play
  • Theories of leisure, recreation and play
  • Compare and contrast serious, project and casual leisure
  • Individual, family, community and global leisure perspectives
  • Individual, family, community and global leisure values
  • Sociology, psychology  and social psychology of recreation & leisure

Leisure, Recreation and the Community

  • An ecological, systems perspective
  • Leisure behaviour and the natural environment
  • Educating the community for leisure and recreation opportunities
  • Political, economic and social resources and community recreation opportunities

Leisure and Recreation Profession

  • History of the development of leisure and recreation profession
  • Employment in the recreation & leisure Industry
  • Recreation & leisure resources on the internet

Education for Leisure

  • Define leisure education
  • Describe current theories of leisure education and apply to leisure theory
  • Describe models of leisure education:  Dattilo and Mundy
  • Describe the benefits of leisure education
  • Describe the components of leisure education programs: leisure awareness, self-awareness, leisure skills and awareness of leisure resources
  • Describe how leisure education is infused into existing programs and services.

Leisure and Recreation Profession

  • History of leisure and recreation profession
  • Employment in the recreation and leisure profession
  • Recreation and leisure resources on the internet
Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

 

  • describe the conceptual foundations of play, recreation, and leisure
  • describe, from a historical perspective, the psychological, sociological, and physiological significance of play, recreation, and leisure
  • discuss the documented benefits of play, recreation, and leisure in contemporary society.
  • discuss the foundations of leisure education and leisure education models and program components.
  • describe the interrelationship between leisure behaviour and natural environment.
  • describe the history and development of the leisure services profession and professional organizations.
  • discuss the roles and interrelationships of diverse leisure service delivery systems, including such specialties as therapeutic recreation, recreation and health promotion.
Means of Assessment

This course will conform to Douglas College policy regarding the number and weighting of evaluations.  Typical means of evaluation would include a combination of:

  • Tests
  • Written assignments
  • Leadership presentation

 

This is a letter graded course.

Textbook Materials

A list of recommended textbooks and materials is provided to students at the beginning of each semester.

Prerequisites

Courses listed here must be completed prior to this course:

  • No prerequisite courses
Corequisites

Courses listed here must be completed either prior to or simultaneously with this course:

  • No corequisite courses
Equivalencies

Courses listed here are equivalent to this course and cannot be taken for further credit:

  • No equivalency courses
Which Prerequisite