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Registration for the Fall 2019 semester begins June 25.  Watch your email for more details.

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Socio-cultural Aspects of Sport, Health, and the Body

Course Code: SPSC 2205
Faculty: Science & Technology
Department: Sport Science
Credits: 3.0
Semester: 15 weeks
Learning Format: Lecture, Tutorial
Typically Offered: TBD. Contact Department Chair for more info.
course overview

This course will explore sport, health, and the body from socio-cultural perspectives. Social structures, institutions, and discourses will be examined to consider their influence on understandings of sport, health and the body within local groups and broader society. Students will also learn and apply qualitative research methods within the context of these three broad areas (sport, health, and the body). Aspects of critical inquiry, reflection, ethics, and debate will also be incorporated.

Course Content

Within each of the content areas below, students will be able to:

  1. Sociological imagination and the study of sport, health, and the body
    • Describe the relationship of individuals influencing and influenced by society
    • Provide examples of the sociological imagination as it applies to sport, health, and the body
    • Explain and apply sociological theories to contemporary examples of sport, health, and the body
  2. Social structures, institutions and discourses influencing sport
    • Describe the relationship between social structures of media and the sport as well as gender
    • Describe the relationship between education (social institution), discourse, sport, and gender
    • Provide examples of the impact of structures, institutions, discourse on sport as well as gender
    • Critically analyze media, social information on institutions, and discourse as it pertains to sport
  3. Sport subcultures
    • Explain the concept of subculture as it pertains to sport
    • Apply concepts of rituals and norms of culture to particular sports
    • Critically examine visual and written literature for acts of resistance in sport subculture
    • Explain resistance within sport subculture as it relates to resistance in broader society
    • Describe the relationship between sport subculture and identity formation
    • Apply concepts of sport subculture to specific ‘real’ situations
  4. Research methods & ethics
    • Explain research and its distinction from other sources of information
    • Describe methods for collecting data, particularly qualitative research methods
    • Describe aspects of a research process (question generation, data collection and analysis)
    • Apply research process by generating a question, collect data, analyze and present findings to the class
    • Demonstrate skills of research and information literacy specifically accessing published research articles from the library, deciphering, summarizing, and synthesizing content, as well as presenting this in oral and written form. 
    • Apply findings from research to support or explain personal experiences
    • Describe ethical issues and apply an ethical decision-making process to specific cases
  5. Social conditions influencing health & health inequities
    • Describe the dimensions of health and their interconnection
    • Explain social structures and their influence on inequalities of health
    • Explain social conditions and their influence on dimensions of health within the Canadian context
    • Apply sociological perspective of health to explain the relationship between conditions and health
  6. The body, its social construction and social inequalities
    • Describe social and biological theories or perspectives of bodies 
    • Describe social theories of power and technologies of the body (Foucault)
    • Apply Foucault’s concepts of power and discipline to examples of sport, health and the body
    • Explain the construction of social norms regarding appropriate bodies and the impact for social exclusion and injustice
    • Apply concepts of socially constructed bodies and marginalization to: gender, age, dis/ability

Methods of Instruction

  • Lecture
  • Tutorials
  • Small and large group discussion
  • Case approach
  • Debates

Means of Assessment

The selection of evaluation tools for this course is based upon adherence to Douglas College evaluation policy regarding number and weighing of evaluations, for example a course of three credits or more should have at least three separate evaluations. 

The following is presented as an example assessment format for this course:

Individual research activity 20%
Group research project 20%
Oral presentation 10%
Case analysis & debate 20%
Tests (midterm & final) 30%

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this course students will:
1. Deepen their understanding of the tenets and theories related to sociology
2. Understand and critically discuss social dynamics influencing the field of physical activity, the body, and 
health.
3. Develop and apply skills of critical inquiry in study of sport, health, and the body
4. Further develop written and oral expression of ideas (literacy)
5. Explore and apply research skills (research literacy)

On completion of this course students will:

  1. Deepen their understanding of the tenets and theories related to sociology
  2. Understand and critically discuss social dynamics influencing the field of physical activity, the body, and health.
  3. Develop and apply skills of critical inquiry in study of sport, health, and the body
  4. Further develop written and oral expression of ideas (literacy)
  5. Explore and apply research skills (research literacy)

course prerequisites

SPSC 1105

curriculum guidelines

Course Guidelines for previous years are viewable by selecting the version desired. If you took this course and do not see a listing for the starting semester/year of the course, consider the previous version as the applicable version.

course schedule and availability
course transferability

Below shows how this course and its credits transfer within the BC transfer system. 

A course is considered university-transferable (UT) if it transfers to at least one of the five research universities in British Columbia: University of British Columbia; University of British Columbia-Okanagan; Simon Fraser University; University of Victoria; and the University of Northern British Columbia.

For more information on transfer visit the BC Transfer Guide and BCCAT websites.

assessments

If your course prerequisites indicate that you need an assessment, please see our Assessment page for more information.