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Human Anatomy and Physiology I

Course Code: BIOL 1103
Faculty: Science & Technology
Department: Biology
Credits: 3.0
Semester: 15 weeks
Learning Format: Lecture, Lab, Tutorial
Typically Offered: TBD. Contact Department Chair for more info.
course overview

Human Anatomy and Physiology I is an introduction to the study of anatomy and physiology of humans. Cell biology and the biochemistry of cells are examined, and the levels of organization in the human body are studied. The anatomy and physiology of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems are covered. Enrolment is usually limited to students in Health Science and Sport Science programs.

Course Content

1.Structure and function of cells

-The structure and function of cell membranes and various cytoplasmic and nuclear components.
-The preparation of and examination (using a compound microscope) of animal and plant cells.
-An explanation of major cellular processes and their significance to the cell.

2.Introduction to biochemistry

-The chemistry of water
-The chemistry of  carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids

3.Homeostasis

-The definition of the term homeostasis, its importance, and the conditions required to fulfill homeostasis.
-The definitions of the terms internal environment, stress, positive feedback system and negative feedback system, and their roles in homeostasis.
-Examples of homeostatic mechanisms, including negative and positive feedback systems.

4.The organization of the human body beyond the cellular level

-The structure and function of the four tissue types.
-The major body systems, their major organs, and the general function of each organ.
-Directional terms as they relate to the human body.
-The body cavities and their organs.

5.The integumentary system

-The identification and description of the components of the epidermis and the dermis.
-Specialized cells, structures, and glands.

6.The skeletal system

-The basic structure, histology, and components of the human skeleton.
-The structure, physiology, and function of bone.
-The changes in skeletal structure during growth and development (ossification).
-Articulations (joints) with respect to their structures and types of movement allowed.
-The basic mechanical principles of movement as they relate to joints (biomechanics).

7.The muscular system

-The types of movements found in humans as a result of skeletal muscle contraction.
-The identification of the principal muscles and muscle groups and their movements.
-The gross anatomy of muscles and microscopic anatomy of muscle tissue.
-The physiology of muscle contraction.

8.The nervous system

-The structure and function of the parts of the brain, the spinal cord, and major nerves.
-The reflex arc.
-The structure and functioning of the sense organs.

Methods of Instruction

This course involves four hours per week of classroom instruction and two hours per week of laboratory activity.  Classroom work will consist of lectures, tutorials, and work in small groups.

Means of Assessment

Evaluation will be carried out in accordance with Douglas College policy. The instructor will present a written course outline with specific evaluation criteria at the beginning of the semester. Evaluation will be based on the following:

Evaluation Marks
Class Tests and Assignments  15-25
Laboratory assignments and quizzes 5-15
Laboratory Examination - final 10-15
Comprehensive Examination - midterm 25-35
Comprehensive Examination - final 25-35
TOTAL 100

 

Notes:

1. Laboratory Experiments and Activities

Laboratory work will be assigned each week.  The laboratory work must be completed in the week it is assigned. Laboratory experiments and assignments are a compulsory component of this course.  A minimum of 50% of the laboratory experiments and assignments must be completed to receive a P or better in the course.  


2. Examinations

There will be one midterm and one final examination.  The final examination will cover the entire course.  If the student achieves a better grade on the final exam than on the midterm examination, the midterm grade will be raised to equal that of the final examination.

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of Biology 1103, the student will be able to:

  1. Use a compound microscope, and describe and identify cell and tissue types in the body.
  2. Describe the basic components of an atom and describe the properties of ionic and covalent bonds.
  3. Describe the chemistry and properties of water, and the structure and biological significance of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids.
  4. Describe the basic principles of homeostasis and negative feedback systems, and provide at least one example of a homeostatic mechanism.      
  5. Describe anatomical structures using appropriate terminology, and specify the locations of various organs and systems.
  6. Describe the components and functions of the integumentary system.
  7. Identify the components of the human skeleton, and describe the structure and growth of long bones.
  8. Describe the types and range of movements of skeletal articulations.
  9. Describe the basic principles of biomechanics.
  10. Describe the location, structure, and functions of the major muscles of the body.
  11. Describe the gross anatomy of muscles and the microanatomy of muscle tissue.
  12. Describe the physiology of muscle contraction.
  13. Describe the components of the nervous system and identify the roles of the major components of the nervous system and associated sensory organs.

course prerequisites

Courses listed here must be completed prior to this course:

  • No prerequisite courses

Corequisites

Courses listed here must be completed either prior to or simultaneously with this course:

  • No corequisite courses

Equivalencies

BIOL 1109

curriculum guidelines

Course Guidelines for previous years are viewable by selecting the version desired. If you took this course and do not see a listing for the starting semester/year of the course, consider the previous version as the applicable version.

course schedule and availability
course transferability

Below shows how this course and its credits transfer within the BC transfer system. 

A course is considered university-transferable (UT) if it transfers to at least one of the five research universities in British Columbia: University of British Columbia; University of British Columbia-Okanagan; Simon Fraser University; University of Victoria; and the University of Northern British Columbia.

For more information on transfer visit the BC Transfer Guide and BCCAT websites.

assessments

If your course prerequisites indicate that you need an assessment, please see our Assessment page for more information.