Nucleic Acids

Faculty
Science & Technology
Department
Biology
Course Code
BIOL 3421
Credits
4.00
Semester Length
15
Max Class Size
28
Method Of Instruction
Lecture
Lab
Typically Offered
To be determined

Overview

Course Description
This course focuses on the structure, function and metabolism of nucleic acids. Topics include nucleic acid metabolism and function, DNA structure and replication, RNA transcription and processing (capping, poly A tail addition, splicing), the formation and function of non-coding RNA (including, rRNA, tRNA, microRNAs and ribozymes), RNA folding, mRNA subcellular localization and RNA dependent RNA/DNA synthesis.
Course Content

1. OVERVIEW OF NUCLEIC ACIDS

  • Structure of a nucleic acid
  • Anabolism and catabolism of nucleic acids
  • Formation and properties of nucleic acid chains
  • Role of nucleotides in cellular functions

 2. STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION DNA

  • Structure of DNA helices
  • DNA replication
  • DNA damage and repair mechanisms
  • DNA recombination
  • DNA modifications

 3. STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF mRNA

  • DNA dependent RNA synthesis
  • mRNA structure
  • Splicing
  • mRNA stability and turnover
  • mRNA localization

 4. STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF tRNA and rRNA

  • tRNA formation, processing and function
  • rRNA formation, processing and function
  • RNA folding (secondary, tertiary and quaternary structures)

 5. STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF SPECIAL FUNCTION RNA MOLECULES

  • microRNA formation
  • ribozymes
  • RNA dependent DNA and RNA synthesis
Methods Of Instruction

Lecture

Laboratory activities

Discussion groups

Readings from scientific journal articles

Guest lectures

Project (e.g. research paper on a topic of current interest, poster presentations)

Means of Assessment

Evaluation will be carried out in accordance with Douglas College policy. The instructor will present a written course outline with specific evaluation criteria at the beginning of the semester. Evaluation will be based on the following:

Evaluation

Marks

Quizzes and assignments        

15-25

Laboratory 

15-25

Midterm examination 

25-35

Final examination

25-35

TOTAL

100

Learning Outcomes

After completing this course, students should be able to:

  1. explain the basic principles of nucleotide metabolism
  2. describe the different functions of nucleic acids
  3. explain why nucleic acids fold and apply that knowledge to predict how a particular nucleotide sequence would fold
  4. describe how mature nucleic acids are formed
  5. explain how to isolate, purify and analyze nucleic acids
  6. analyze scientific data, be able to interpret them in the proper context, and to formulate hypotheses and design future experiments that build upon the data studied
Textbook Materials

Students should consult the Douglas College Bookstore for the latest required textbooks and materials. For example textbooks and materials may include:

DL Nelson and MM Cox. Lehninger – Principles of Biochemistry (Current edition).  New York: Worth Publishers

 

Requisites

Prerequisites

Corequisites

None

Equivalencies

None

Requisite for

None

Course Guidelines

Course Guidelines for previous years are viewable by selecting the version desired. If you took this course and do not see a listing for the starting semester / year of the course, consider the previous version as the applicable version.

Course Transfers

Institution Transfer Details Effective Dates
Athabasca University (AU) AU BIOL 4XX (3) 2017/09/01 to -
Capilano University (CAPU) CAPU BIOL 2XX (4) 2017/09/01 to -
Coquitlam College (COQU) No credit 2017/09/01 to -
Kwantlen Polytechnic University (KPU) KPU BIOL 3XXX (4) 2017/09/01 to -
Langara College (LANG) LANG BIOL 3XXX (4) 2017/09/01 to -
Northern Lights College (NLC) NLC BIOL 3XX (3) 2019/01/01 to -
Simon Fraser University (SFU) SFU MBB 2XX (3) 2017/09/01 to -
University Canada West (UCW) UCW BIOL 3XX (3) 2017/09/01 to -
University of Northern BC (UNBC) UNBC BCMB 403 (3) 2017/09/01 to -
University of the Fraser Valley (UFV) UFV BIO 4XX (3) 2017/09/01 to -
Vancouver Community College (VCC) No credit 2017/09/01 to -

Course Offerings

Summer 2021

There aren't any scheduled upcoming offerings for this course.