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Registration for the Fall 2019 semester begins June 25.  Watch your email for more details.

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Human Anatomy & Physiology II

Course Code: BIOL 1205
Faculty: Science & Technology
Department: Biology
Credits: 3.0
Semester: 15 weeks
Learning Format: Lecture, Lab, Seminar
Typically Offered: TBD. Contact Department Chair for more info.
course overview

This course is a continuation of the study of human anatomy and physiology. Students use a problem solving process to examine digestion, cellular respiration, fluids and electrolytes, excretion, the nervous system, endocrine system and genetics. Enrolment is usually limited to students in the Therapeutic Recreation program.

Course Content

1. NUTRITION                  

-carbohydrate, lipid, and protein chemistry.

-roles of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, vitamins, and minerals.

-nutritional requirements

-diet  

-disorders 

2. DIGESTIVE SYSTEM  

-organization

-structure and function of the oral cavity, esophagus, stomach, pancreas, liver, gall bladder, small intestine, and large intestine.

-digestive system hormones and enzymes.

-fates of carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins.

-disorders 

3. METABOLISM              

-energy systems – aerobic and anaerobic

-carbohydrate, lipid, and protein metabolism

-glycogenesis, glycogenolysis, and gluconeogenesis

-regulation of metabolism

-disorders 

4. FLUIDS AND ELECTROLYTES                                               

-fluid compartments

-fluid balance

-roles of water

-electrolyte distribution

-electrolyte functions

-electrolyte regulation

-acid-base balance

-disorders 

5. EXCRETORY SYSTEM

-structure and function of the kidney, nephron, ureters, bladder, and urethra.

-physiology of urine formation

-homeostasis

-disorders

6. NERVOUS SYSTEM

-organization of the central nervous system (CNS), peripheral nervous system (PNS), and autonomic nervous system (ANS)

-structure and function of the brain

-structure and function of the spinal cord

-physiology of impulse transmission

-spinal and cranial nerves

-neurotransmitters

-sensory and motor pathways – motor unit

-reflex arc

-sensory receptors

-proprioception

-special senses – vision, hearing, smell, taste

-disorders 

7. ENDOCRINE SYSTEM

-endocrine glands and their hormones – structure and function

-mechanism of hormone action

-feedback control

-general adaptation syndrome

-homeostasis                                             

-disorders 

8. GENETICS                   

-principles of genetics                                            

-modes of inheritance                                           

-amniocentesis                                            

-disorders 

Methods of Instruction

This course involves four hours of lectures, laboratory activities and self-directed, interdependent, small group and problem-based learning. The information content is integrated with problem sets, videos, laboratory experiences, journal articles and textbook readings.

Means of Assessment

Evaluation will be carried out in accordance with Douglas College policy. The instructor will present a written course outline with specific evaluation criteria at the beginning of the semester. Evaluation will be based on the following:

TYPE OF EVALUATION Marks
Case study/participation     10-15
Weekly quizzes    5-10
Project  15-25
Term exam 1  15-25
Term exam 2  15-25
Final exam  20-30
TOTAL     100

Notes:

  1. Weekly cases: Weekly group work (in class and in lab) will be evaluated in two ways.  Each working group will hand in their responses to the case, together with a Peer Evaluation Rubric, completed by each team member.  The responses will be evaluated by the instructor for completeness, correctness and group participation.  In addition, a short quiz will be administered at the beginning of the class following a case in order to assess individual understanding of the case.
  2. Examinations are a combination Multiple Choice and Short Answer Questions. Each term exam will take between 1.5 and 2 hours, and the final exam will take between 1.5 and 3 hours.

       

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, students will:

  1. Have gained an understanding of basic human anatomy and physiology in a context that will be useful to them in their work.
  2. Have learned how to integrate knowledge, including how to use inquiry, critical thinking and scientific reasoning to solve problems.
  3. Have experienced the value of teamwork, of developing good interpersonal skills, and the importance of psycho social issues in maintaining health and wellness.

More specifically, students will have learned to:

  • Develop an appreciation for the interrelated nature of the physical, biological and behavioural mechanisms that must be considered with each health problem during the process of generating a management plan.
  • Reinforce and/or develop effective reasoning processes including the skills of problem solving, hypothesis generation, critical appraisal of available information, data analysis and decision-making.
  • Effectively use a problem-solving process to formulate a plan to address any health-related problem independently or in a group, in a timely manner.
  • Critically evaluate literature, research findings, laboratory data and other resources in relation to accuracy, relevance and utility.
  • Develop creative strategies for addressing problems by considering alternative ways of viewing a problem or situation.
  • Function effectively as an active participant within a small group.
  • Share and explain information.

course prerequisites

BIOL 1105 with C- or better or permission of the instructor

curriculum guidelines

Course Guidelines for previous years are viewable by selecting the version desired. If you took this course and do not see a listing for the starting semester/year of the course, consider the previous version as the applicable version.

course schedule and availability
course transferability

Below shows how this course and its credits transfer within the BC transfer system. 

A course is considered university-transferable (UT) if it transfers to at least one of the five research universities in British Columbia: University of British Columbia; University of British Columbia-Okanagan; Simon Fraser University; University of Victoria; and the University of Northern British Columbia.

For more information on transfer visit the BC Transfer Guide and BCCAT websites.

assessments

If your course prerequisites indicate that you need an assessment, please see our Assessment page for more information.

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