Students travelling to Uganda to work in health and social service fields

A group of 10 Douglas College students will gain practical experience delivering support to vulnerable groups such as orphans, people with mental illness, and youth at risk while living and working in Uganda. Departing April 30, the participants in this year’s Uganda Project trip will spend 10 weeks completing practicum placements at various health and social service institutions in the East African country.

Started in 2006, the Uganda Project is an educational program for students in the Faculty of Child, Family and Community Studies. This year’s participants are from the Classroom and Community Support, Community Social Service Work, Co-occurring Disorders, Early Childhood Education, and Therapeutic Recreation programs.

“The trip is an important educational and cultural experience for students. Working with and helping people in a different country helps prepare them for careers in culturally diverse workplaces here in Canada,” says Janice Spencer, a Therapeutic Recreation Instructor and Project Coordinator.

“Spending over two months immersed in Ugandan culture definitely gets students out of their comfort zone. But they always come back and say it was a positive, transformative experience. It really expands their worldview,” Spencer says.

Once in Uganda, most of the students will stay together in group accommodations in Masaka, a town southwest of the country’s capital, Kampala. Others will stay in a nearby village. For their placements, the students will work for local government and non-government organizations in the Masaka region.

The for-credit placements, organized by college faculty and partner organizations in Uganda, are designed to suit students’ fields of study. The annual Uganda Project trips are largely supported by the fundraising efforts of the participating students.



Janice Spencer, Instructor, Therapeutic Recreation
604 777 6239

Wendy Parry, Faculty, Child, Family and Community Studies
604 527 5620